/Files/images/mugshots-philadelphia.jpg mug shot

Meaning: a photograph of someone taken after their arrest

For example:

  1. The photo in my passport is awful. It looks like a mug shot.
  2. The police gave Linda a book of mug shots to look through, but she couldn't find the man who attacked her.
/Files/images/a65YiFvQUPU.jpg /Files/images/i1Yh4iME5T0.jpg

jam

Meaning: to play music informally

For example:

  1. After the concert, we went to a jazz club and jammed all night with some old musician friends.
  2. When she was young, Judy learned how to play the drums by jamming with other musicians.

/Files/images/family-watching-3d-movie.jpg flick

Meaning: a movie

For example:

  1. Have you seen the new Batman flick yet?
  2. Those Bollywood flicks are fun to watch, but they're pretty crazy.

Note: Also "the flicks", meaning the movies, as in "Let's go to the flicks on Saturday night."

Variety: This is typically used in British and Australian English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/news-man-taking-a-break.jpg break

Meaning: an opportunity for advancement in one's career, a lucky turn of events

For example:

  1. While singing in a club, Tracey was seen by a major music producer and offered the chance to record. It was the break she'd been dreaming of for years.
  2. Bobby's big break came when a talent scout for one of the top teams in Europe saw him playing for his high school soccer team.

/Files/images/pregnant-244662_640.jpg up the duff

Meaning: pregnant

For example:

  1. Terry got his girlfriend up the duff, and then he dumped her. What a creep!
  2. Debbie's up the duff, and she doesn't know what to do about it.

Variety: This slang term is typically used in British and Australian English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/sick-day.jpg sickie

Meaning: a day taken off work after calling in sick when one is actually well

For example:

  1. Paul throws a sickie at least once a month. I wonder if his boss has noticed that he's always "sick" when the weather is beautiful?
  2. Robbo reckons the surf's awesome today, so I'm chuckin' a sickie and headin' down the coast.

Variety: This slang term is typically used in British and Australian English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/annoyance-clipart-k14870963.jpg Rats!

Meaning: an exclamation that shows that you are quite annoyed

For example:

  1. When Denise realised she'd left her purse at home, she said, "Rats! I'll have to go back and get it."
  2. Jamie doesn't say much when he's playing golf, but whenever he misses a putt he says "Rats!"

Variety: This is typically used in American English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/Ray Liotta Narc.PNG narc | nark

Meaning: a narcotics officer, a police officer investigating drug trade

For example:

  1. The narcs raided the dealer's apartment after being tipped off by his neighbours.
  2. There are a lot of narks working at the airport.

Origin: short for "narcotic", meaning a powerful pain-relieving drug like heroin or morphine

/Files/images/beatbox.jpg beat box

Meaning: to create rhythmic percussive sounds with your mouth, especially when accompanying rhymes or rapping

For example:

  1. Last year there was a guy on American Idol who was really good at beat boxing.
  2. You do the beat box stuff and I'll bust some rhymes.

Origin: Originally "beat box" meant an electronic drum machine of the sort used to create percussive sounds in rap and hip-hop music. Musicians then began creating similar "click" and "pop" sounds with their mouths, and these musicians were called "human beat boxes". The word "beat box" then came to mean the act of creating these sounds to provide a rhythmic accompaniment to vocal artists who're reciting rhymes or rapping.

Variety: This slang term is typically used in American English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/4228587_orig.jpg hood

Meaning: a neighbourhood, especially in a poor, urban area

For example:

  1. Jerome often goes back to the hood to see his family and hang out with old friends.
  2. A lot of rap artists tell stories about life in the hood.

Origin: short for "neighbourhood"; first appeared in Black American English in the 1970's

Variety: This slang term is typically used in American English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/old-torn-jeans-holes.jpg ratty

Meaning: in poor condition; worn or damaged because of continuous use

For example:

  1. Ratty old jeans are always in fashion among rock musicians.
  2. Don't you think it's time we replaced that ratty wallpaper in the kitchen?

Variety: This is typically used in American and Australian English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/100 Aussie Word.jpg Aussie

Meaning: Australian, Australia

For example:

  1. My mate Bruce says he's a typical Aussie because he likes beer, sports, mates, cars and girls, in that order.
  2. Have you ever seen Aussie Rules football? It's a bit like rugby, but much faster and more spectacular.

Note: also sometimes spelt "Ozzie"

Origin: short for Australia

Variety:This is typically used in Australian English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/take-clipart-afd-105053.jpg take

Meaning: stolen money or goods

For example:

  1. The take from the bank robbery was about ten thousand dollars.
  2. The cops have caught the thieves, but they're still looking for the take.

/Files/images/a5dc354bd2b8767030f0bcdfdb2fd707.jpg twit

!!! OFFENSIVE !!! VERY INFORMAL !!!
Meaning: a silly, stupid person

For example:

  1. My sister has dropped out of university. She's such a twit!
  2. Sharon ran up to Ben, shouting "You stupid twit!"

/Files/images/e16a8c1e8dc0c34886a1d14faa38be28.jpg busted

Meaning: to be charged with a criminal offence

For example:

  1. Our neighbours were busted for possessing marijuana and speed pills after the cops raided their house last night.
  2. The cops raided a bar in Washington and the president's daughter was busted for under-age drinking. She was let off with a warning.

/Files/images/u12236814.jpg afters

Meaning: dessert, sweet dish eaten after the main course of a meal

For example:

  1. What's for afters, mum?
  2. We're having apple pie for afters tonight.

Note: sometimes also used to mean a footballer's angry reaction to being badly tackled or otherwise manhandled by the opposition

Variety: This is typically used in British English but may be used in other varieties of English too.

/Files/images/gibson-l5.jpg /Files/images/Selmer Sax.jpg

axe | ax

Meaning: a musical instrument, esp. a jazz musician's guitar, trumpet or saxophone

For example:

  1. Louis grabbed his axe, stood in front of his band, and started to play.
  2. Eddie could play that ax all night long.
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